> Norma Waterson > Songs > The Chaps of Cockaigny

The Chaps of Cockaigny

[trad. arr. Norma Waterson, Eliza Carthy, Ben Ivitsky]

Sung by Norma Waterson on her third solo album Bright Shiny Morning. She is accompanied by Eliza Carthy, tenor guitar, vocals, violin; Mary Macmaster, electro harp; Martin Carthy, guitar; and Ben Ivitsky, violin.

Norma Waterson said in the Bright Shiny Morning sleeve notes:

From Cecil Sharp's manuscript and sung to him by Lucy White in Somerset in 1904. Cockaigny is an old name for England, and is also the name of a mining town, hence: 'her eyes are as black as Cockaigny's black coal'.

Lyrics

Oh the chaps of Cockaigny they're stout roving blades
And when they get in company with sweet pretty maids
They will kiss them aye and court them and swear that they'll be true
But the very next morning they will go and leave you

Now Cockaigny is a fine town it shines where it stands
And the more I think on it the more my heart burns
And if I was in Cockaigny I'd think myself at home
For there we do get sweethearts but here we get none

For their eyes are as black as Cockaigny's black coal
Which through my poor bosom has burned a big hole
And they'll kiss you aye and court you and tell you as many lies
As hairs upon your head my love or the stars in the skies

Now Cockaigny is a fine town it shines where it stands
And the more I think on it the more my heart burns
And if I was in Cockaigny I'd think myself at home
For there we do get sweethearts and here we get none

Oh the chaps of Cockaigny they're stout roving blades
And when they get in company with sweet pretty maids
They will kiss them aye and court them and swear that they'll be true
But the very next morning they will go and leave you

Acknowledgements

Transcribed by Garry Gillard.