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Sandgate Dandling Song

[ Roud B24532 ; Robert Nunn (1809-1853)]

The Sandgate Dandling Song was written by Robert Nunn (1809-1853), a blind fiddler from Tyneside. The tune is a traditional Tyneside melody that was also used by Stan Kelly for his Liverpool Lullaby.

Isla Cameron sang the Sandgate Nursing Song in 1956 on her Tradition album Through Bushes and Briars and in 1961 on her and Louis Killen's Prestige album of Northumbrian songs and ballads, The Waters of Tyne. Ewan MacColl commented in the latter album's sleeve notes:

Robert Nunn (1808-1853), the author of this fine song, was on of the most talented creators of ‘Geordie Songs’. A slater by trade, Nunn lost his sight after falling from a roof and thereafter managed to eke out a living by playing the fiddle and singing at miners' meetings and in pubs.

The Ian Campbell Folk Group sang The Sandgate Dandle on their 1965 Transatlantic album Coaldust Ballads. Their sleeve notes commented:

Words by the blind fiddler, Robert Nunn, who died in 1853. The tune is a traditional Tyneside Melody, often called Dollia.

Sue Brown and Lorraine Irwing sang the Sandgate Dandling Song in 1997 on their WildGoose album Call & Cry. They commented in their liner notes:

Written by the blind Tyneside fiddler Robert Nunn in 1842. Sue found this moving song of love and loyalty in a book she borrowed from school twenty years ago.

Anni Fentiman sang the Sandgate Wife's Nurse Song in 1998 on her and Dave Webber's CD Constant Lovers. They noted:

A dandling song (a song used to entertain a small child). The Keelman in this song is not all good [referring to the Keelman in the song Sandgate Lass on the Ropery Banks on the same album].

Jon Wilks sang The Sandgate Dandling on his 2017 album Songs from the Attic.

Lyrics

Robert Nunn's Sandgate Dandling Song Jon Wilks sings The Sandgate Dandling

Hold thy way, my bonny bairn,
Hold thy way up on my arm,
Hold thy way, thou soon may learn
To say Dada, so canny.
I wish thy daddy may be well,
He's long in coming from the keel,
Though his black face be like the de'il,
I like a kiss from Johnny.

Hold your way, my bonny bairn,
Hold your way up on my arm,
Hold your way and you'll soon learn
To say Dada, so canny.
I wish my Johnny may be well,
He's long in coming from the keel,
Though his black face'll be like hell,
I like a kiss from Johnny.

Thou really has thy daddy's chin,
Thou art like him, leg and wing,
And I, with pleasure, can thee sing,
Since thou belongs my Johnny.
Johnny is a clever lad,
Last night he fuddled all he had,
This morn he wasn't very bad,
He looked as blithe as any.

Now it's a struggle everyday,
Living on my Johnny's pay,
When the bugger drinks it all away
He leaves me without any.
My Johnny is a clever lad,
Last night he fuddled all we had,
This morning wasn't very bad,
He looked as blithe as any.

Though thou's the first, thou's not the last,
I mean to have my bairns fast,
And when this happy time is past
I still will love my Johnny.
For his hair's brown and so is thine,
Thine eyes are grey, and so are mine,
Thy nose is tapered off so fine,
Thou's like thy daddy Johnny.

Though you're the first, you're not the last,
I mean to have my babies fast,
And when this happy time is past
Will I still love my Johnny?
But when Johnny's drunk he'll take the knife,
And threaten sore to end my life,
Who wouldn't be a keelman's wife,
To have a man like Johnny.

Thy canny dowp is fat and round,
And like thy dad, thou's plump and sound,
Thou's worth to me a thousand pound,
Thou's altogether bonny.
When daddy's drunk, he'll take his knife
And threaten sore to take my life,
Who wouldn't be a keelman's wife,
To have a man like Johnny.

But yonder's daddy, coming now,
He looks the best among the crew,
They're all going to the Barley Mow
To have a glass with Johnny.
So let's go get the bacon fried,
And let us make a clean fireside,
Then on his knee he will thee ride,
When he comes home to mammy.

But yonder Johnny's coming now,
He looks the best among the crew
And they're all off to the Barley Mow
To have a drink with Johnny.
So let us get the bacon fried,
And let us make a clean fireside,
Then on his knee he will thee ride,
When he comes home to mammy.

Links

See also the Mudcat Café thread Lyr Req: Sandgate Dandling Song and Jon Wilks' Folk from the Attic blog Sandgate Dandling Song.