> Steeleye Span > Songs > Cam Ye O'er Frae France

Cam Ye O'er Frae France

[ Roud 5814 ; G/D 1:120 ; Ballad Index DTCYOFF ; trad.; from Hogg's Jacobite Reliques]

George I, being a protestant German king, was viewed with ridicule and hatred by the Jacobite rebels. This is a scurrilous attack upon him and his court.

The Ian Campbell Folk Group sang Cam Ye O'er Frae France in 1966 on their Transatlantic EP Four Highland Songs. Ian Campbell commented in the sleeve notes:

Cam Ye O'er Frae France is one of many bitter satirical songs composed by the Jacobites about the court of George I or Geordie Whelps (Guelph). The goose referred to is Madame Schulenburg, Duchess of Kendal, Geordies mistress, and the linkin' blade was the Count Königsmark. The only other identifiable name is Bobbin John presumed to be the Earl of Mar, Commander in Chief of the English army in Scotland.

Owen Hand sang Cam Ye O'er Frae France in 1966 on his Transatlantic album I Loved a Lass.

Ewan MacColl sang Cam Ye O'er Frae France in 1968 on his Topic/Folkways album The Jacobite Rebellions. A live recording made in Chicago in September 1984 was released in 1990 on his Cooking Vinyl album Black and White. The Folkways album notes commented:

When George the First imported his seraglio of impoverished gentlewomen from Germany, he provided the Jacobite songwriters with material for some of their most ribald verses. Madame Kielmansegg, Countess of Platen, is referred to exclusively as “The Sow” in the songs, while his favourite mistress, the lean and haggard Madame Schulenburg, afterwards crested Duchess of Kendall, was given the name of “The Goose”. She is the goosie referred to in this song. The “blade” mentioned is the Count Königsmark. “Bobbing John” refers to John, Earl of Mar, who, at the time this song was made, was recruiting Highlanders for the Hanoverian cause. “Geordie Whelps” is, of course, George the First.

Archie Fisher sang Cam Ye O'er Frae France in 1969 on an album with songs of the Jacobite Rebellions, The Fate o' Charlie.

Dick Gaughan sang Cam' Ye Ower Frae France in 1972 on his Trailer album, No More Forever. He also sang it in 1995 on Clan Alba's eponymous and only CD, Clan Alba. He commented in his original album's notes:

Cam' Ye Ower Frae France is a witty and bitingly satirical song, which shows the general feeling of the Scots to the replacement of the Stuarts by the Hanoverarians. The Scots apparently found it illogical to have a puppet king who hardly spoke a word of English, seemed unaware of the existence of Gaelic, and appeared to have an intense preoccupation with gardening. The time signature varies between 7/4 and 6/8.

Steeleye Span sang Cam Ye O'er Frae France in 1973 on their album Parcel of Rogues, accompanying the record's title track Rogues in a Nation. They recorded it a second time for their CD Present to accompany the December 2002 Steeleye Span reunion tour.

At least five live recordings of Cam Ye O'er Frae France with several Steeleye Span line-ups are or were available:

  1. from the Royal Opera Theatre in Adelaide, Australia, in 1982 on the CD Gone to Australia,
  2. from the Beck Theatre, Hayes, Middlesex, on September 16, 1989 on the video A 20th Anniversary Celebration:
  3. from their 1991 tour on the CD Tonight's the Night… Live,
  4. from The Forum, London, on September 2, 1995 on the CD The Journey,
  5. and from Southampton Civic Hall on May 15, 2004 on both the video The 35th Anniversary World Tour 2004 and the CD The Official Bootleg.

Drinkers Drouth sang Cam Ye Ower Frae France in 1982 on their first album, When the Kye Comes Hame. This track was also included in 2001 on their Greentrax compilation Drinkers Drouth with Davy Steele: A Tribute.

Isla St Clair sang Come Ye O'er Frae France on her 1993 CD Inheritance.

Lyrics

Steeleye Span sing Cam Ye O'er Frae France

Cam ye o'er frae France? Cam ye down by Lunnon?
Saw ye Geordie Whelps and his bonny woman?
Were ye at the place ca'd the Kittle Housie?
Saw ye Geordie's grace riding on a goosie?

Geordie, he's a man there is little doubt o't;
He's done a' he can, wha can do without it?
Down there came a blade linkin' like my lordie;
He wad drive a trade at the loom o' Geordie.

Though the claith were bad, blythly may we niffer;
Gin we get a wab, it makes little differ.
We hae tint our plaid, bonnet, belt and swordie,
Ha's and mailins braid—but we hae a Geordie!

Jocky's gane to France and Montgomery's lady;
There they'll learn to dance: Madam, are ye ready?
They'll be back belyve, belted, brisk and lordly;
Brawly may they thrive to dance a jig wi' Geordie!

Hey for Sandy Don! Hey for Cockolorum!
Hey for Bobbing John and his Highland Quorum!
Mony a sword and lance swings at Highland hurdie;
How they'll skip and dance o'er the bum o' Geordie!

(Repeat first verse)

Acknowledgements

The lyrics are from Ewan MacColl: The Folk Songs and Ballads of Scotland, New York: Oak Publications, 1965.