> Lal & Mike Waterson > Songs > The Scarecrow

The Scarecrow

[Lal & Mike Waterson]

Mike Waterson sang The Scarecrow, accompanied by Richard Thompson and Martin Carthy on acoustic guitars, in 1972 on Lal & Mike Waterson's famous album of their own songs, Bright Phoebus. A 1971 demo version was included in 2017 on the album's reissue's bonus CD.

Tony Capstick sang The Scarecrow in 1978 on his live album Tony Capstick Does a Turn.

June Tabor sang The Scarecrow in 1983 on her Topic album Abyssinians. This recording was also included in 1990 on her anthology Aspects and in 2003 on The Definitive Collection. She commented:

The strength of visual image is worthy of Ingmar Bergman, as is the story; the Earth Mother is all-powerful here.

The Fatima Mansions sang The Scarecrow in 1992 on their EP Evil Man.

Deb Sandland, Phil Beer and Jem McAuley sang The Scarecrow in 2000 on the Teenage Cancer Trust charity album Heart of England.

Dick Gaughan sang The Scarecrow in 2002 on the tribute album Shining Bright: The Songs of Lal & Mike Waterson. This recording was also included in 2006 on his anthology Dick Gaughan: The Definitive Collection.

James Yorkston sang The Scarecrow in 2003 on his EP Someplace Simple.

The Witches of Elswick sang The Scarecrow in 2003 on their album Out of Bed. They commented in their liner notes:

Becky thinks this song deals with the changing of the seasons and the passing of time, the others think it's about sex—with a scarecrow. Fay's not allowed to do harmonies very often because it scares us. This is what she came out with. Don't be afraid to be afraid.

Tinkerscuss sang The Scarecrow in 2007 on their CD Mythago.

Lyrics

Mike Waterson sings The Scarecrow

As I roved out one summer's morn,
I saw a scarecrow tied to a pole in a field of corn.
His coat was black and his head was bare,
And as the wind shook him the crows took up into the air.

Ah, but you'd lay me down and love me,
Ah, but you'd lay me down and love me if you could.
For you're only a bag of rags in an overall
That the wind sways so the crows fly away and the corn can grow tall.

As I roved out one winter's day,
I saw an old man hanging from a pole in a field of clay.
His coat was gone and his head hung low,
Till the wind flung it up to look, wrung its neck and let it go.

How could you lay me down and love me?
How could you lay me down and love me now?
For you're only a bag of bones in an overall
That the wind blows and the kids throw stones at the thing on the pole.

As I rode out one fine spring day,
I saw twelve jolly dons dressed out in the blue and the gold so gay.
And to a stake they tied a child newborn,
And the songs were sung, the bells was rung, and they sowed their corn.

Now you can lay me down and love me,
Now you can lay me down and love me if you will.
For you're only a bag of rags in an overall
But the wind blew and the sun shone too and the corn grew tall.

As I roved out one summer's morn,
I saw a scarecrow tied to a pole in a field of corn.

June Tabor sings The Scarecrow

As I walked out one summer's morn,
Saw a scarecrow tied to a pole in a field of corn.
His coat was black, and his head was bare,
When the wind shook him the crows took up into the air.

Ah, but you'd lay me down and love me,
Ah, but you'd lay me down and love me if you could.
But you're only a bag of rags in an overall
That the wind sways and the crows fly away and the corn grows tall.

As I walked out one winter's day,
Saw an old man hanging from a pole in a field of clay.
His coat was gone, and his head hung low,
Till the wind flung it up to look, wrung its neck and let it go.

How could you lay me down and love me?
How could you lay me down and love me now?
For you're only a bag of bones in an overall
That the wind blows and the kids throw stones at the thing on the pole.

As I walked out one fine spring day,
Saw twelve jolly dons decked out in the blue and the gold so gay.
And to a stake they tied a child newborn,
Then the bells were rung and the songs were sung and they sowed their corn.

Now you can lay me down and love me,
Now you can lay me down and love me if you will.
But you're only a bag of rags in an overall
But the wind blew and the sun shone too and the corn grew tall.

As I walked out one summer's morn,
Saw a scarecrow tied to a pole in a field of corn.

The Fatima Mansions sing The Scarecrow

As I walked out one summer's morn,
I saw a scarecrow tied to a pole in a field of corn.
His coat was black and his head was bare,
When the wind shook him, the crows took up into the air.

Ah, but you'd lay me down and love me,
Ah, but you'd lay me down and love me, if you could.
But you're only a bag of rags in an overall
That the wind sways and the crows fly away and the corn grows tall.

As I walked out one winter's day,
I saw an old man dangling from a pole in a field of clay.
His coat was gone and his head hung low,
Till the wind flung it up to look, wrung its neck and let it go.

How could you lay me down and love me?
How could you lay me down and love me now?
For that you're only a bag of bones in an overall
That the wind blows and the kids throw stones at the thing on the pole.

As I walked out one fine spring day,
I saw twelve jolly dons decked out in the blue and the gold so gay.
And to a stake they tied a child new born,
Then the bells were rung, and the songs were sung, and they sowed their corn.

And now you can lay me down and love me,
Now you can lay me down and love me if you will.
But you're only a bag of rags in an overall
That the wind blew and the sun shone too and the corn grew tall.

As I walked out one summer's morn,
I saw a scarecrow tied to a pole in a field of corn.